Wake Me Up When It's All Over by Issarezal Ismail



Wake Me Up When It’s All Over - Volume II
 
Burnout. Perhaps that is a word that may be able to represent the psycho-biological situation of the body, mind and emotions of all of us when faced with the Movement Control Order (MCO) for the third time. All soci0-economic activities came to a halt after for some time it had been going on even with full vigilance and under strict rules. 
 
The works in this series are inspired from my personal experience in Seri Iskandar, Perak during the MCO 3.0 period. As a result of sitting at home for too long, every morning as early as 8:00 I would wake up and drive to a supermarket whose location is close to my house. The purpose of that journey is that I can release fatigue by enjoying the environment outside my residence. 
 
Although only for a moment, I observed and enjoyed every single element of the round trip. Unsurprisingly, the result of my experiences often end up evoking my memories of various events, happenings or stories from the past that are so meaningful to myself and all of which I re-composed through all the works from this series. 
 
The combination of subjects which is sleeping / resting figure and everyday objects are composed to represent situations of exhaustion that are diverted to evoke memories of past experience that I often forget, especially when life situation take place without interruption; an act of activating the freedom of imaginative mind when all other things are so tightly controlled, closed and regulated that it tend to be exhausting. 



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #12

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #13

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #16

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #18

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #20

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #21

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #22

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #23

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #24

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #25

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #26

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #27

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #28

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #29

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #30

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #31

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #32

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #33

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved



Wake Me Up When It's All Over #34

Acrylic on boxboard | 36 x 36 cm | 2020
RM 600 | Reserved

POV by Atiqah Khairul, Clara Wong Pei San, Heidhir Hamdan & Wong Hui Lynn



POV - Voices of Tomorrow
Essay by Elizabeth Low Sue Mei

It is often said with great conviction that young people today are the leaders of tomorrow. Similarly, our emerging artists are the building blocks for the future of the Malaysian art scene. While we owe the foundation of the history and development of the art scene to our forefathers and senior art professionals, we can still look forward to the prospective of what lies ahead. With every passing year, there is a growing number of enthusiastic and passionate emerging talents in our industry. It is vital for them to have spaces for their stories to be told, and platforms for their artistic careers to be shaped. 

An acronym for the term ‘point of view’, POV, is concerned with highlighting the different perspectives and views of the collective line-up of four emerging artists. They are Atiqah Khairul, Clara Wong Pei San, Heidhir Hamdan, and Wong Hui Lynn. Selected for their enthusiasm, passion, and potential, their body of works consist of a diverse set of stories, musings, and experiences from their point of view.

Atiqah Khairul's paintings are effectively a visual diary of her time during the MCO 3.0. Known for her hyperrealistic technique, documentation has remained an important aspect of her work since her MA. A set of seven canvases, ‘Tujuh Hari’, which translates to ‘seven days’, represents the seven days of the week. Each canvas has been painted to create the illusion of a square opening that has been neatly cut out from the centre. What appears to be left of the canvas, frames the mundane, everyday objects in Atiqah’s studio. Featuring her paint rag, colour pencils, and tools, among other things, every subject accompanied with a painted yellow sticky note. Each sticky note is marked with four to five date stamps, all of which are a week apart from each other, collectively making up the month of July. 

Evidently, she has taken elements from her days in lockdown to create a calendar of her own. Channeling her long-time fascination towards dates, she has utilized her surroundings to tell her story and experience. Underlining the side-effects of the lockdown fatigue with subtlety, her work is essentially a quiet contemplation and introspection towards the passing of her time at home. 

Clara Wong Pei San's body of work comprises still life of stones arranged in a delicate balance. Pertaining to the perplexing dubieties of our existence, religion, and relationships, she has expressed her search for the “truth of life” through her creative practice. Her use of colour palette in this body of work, though muted, are evidently associated with nature. While the background is vague, with no clear insight to its location, the position of the distinctive shadows and play with light allows a clue to the time. The quiet environment of the background and the chosen subject creates a peaceful setting free of distractions. 

The composition of the painting ‘Persistence’, is made out of seven stones. With hues of green, which she associates with life and energy, Clara has created a structure that is evidently true to its name. Against the odds of its precarious display, there is a spirit of resilience and resolve in the way its posture is maintained. Regardless, without the promise of stability, there is boldness in the chosen arrangement. Each stone is not without its purpose, and role. ‘Persistence’, is not unlike the rest of Clara’s paintings; it demonstrates her perception towards life. It is a peaceful acknowledgement towards the infinite questions one may have.

Heidhir Hamdan describes his work as a visual commentary towards topics of the digital age, technology advancement, and modernisation, from the shoes of a middle class citizen.  Elements of high technology and influences of science fiction are juxtaposed against paintings that appear as images from an old photo album. A sense of nostalgia is evoked by the effect of the faded imagery; this perhaps further emphasizes on the delayed introduction of certain technologies within the middle to lower class groups. There are clear influences of western movies, with notable characters such as Yoda from the Star Wars universe, and the fictional kaiju character, Godzilla. These characters make an impressive appearance in the surreal landscapes which were realised by the boundless imaginative mind of the artist. 

The painting, ‘Simulation Rift’ stands out from the others, as it is set in the home of the artist. Describing it as “a typical, traditional home of a middle-class Malay family”, the environment is contrasted against the simulation created by a virtual reality (VR) machine worn by the figure in the artwork. The illustrative scene of action depicted is strikingly foreign in this setting, a poetic expression of the distinct gap and barriers between the different social class groups.

Wong Hui Lynn's body of work observes the quiet, mysterious nature of introverts. Drawing inspiration from her own personality, it is fitting that self-portraiture is consistently present within her paintings. Her study towards the character traits of introverts was prompted by her own experience of feeling misunderstood and struggles in expressing herself. In embracing this aspect of her nature, she has channeled her perspective towards expressing the pressures she has faced from being an introvert through her work.

'Should I Get A Haircut?', illustrates two identical faces framed by a stormy sea of hair. There is a perception of emotional chaos manifested within the curly and wild waves that dominate a large area of the work. This is a stark comparison to the passive expression of the subjects that seem to be physically overwhelmed by its surroundings. Despite hands that reach out to fight against the volume and weight of the mane, the figures appear to be in the deep end of their internal turmoil; they are unfazed by the colourful marbles found scattered throughout the painting. Evidently, what Hui Lynn has depicted is an introvert's need for space to digest their emotions. Her surreal and bold compositions convey the personal emotions and experiences that she is unable to find the words for.

 The diversity in the range of topics and themes presented by each artist encapsulates the vibrant individuality of our youth today. In essence, their works collectively make up a kaleidoscope of their opinions, ideas, experiences, all of which will continue to evolve and shape with time. Thus, as they embark on their creative journey let us continue to uplift the youth of our industry, for it is important to fan the flame of their fiery passion. 


Let their visions be respected, and let their voices be heard.


Atiqah Khairul Anuar

My subject matters are most often mundane objects that exist around me and that I come in contact with. I acknowledge the power and significance behind our environment and surroundings in shaping us to the person we are today. I believe that this is applicable to everyone, whether they are conscious of it or not. 

Home used to be a place of both comfort and control. It is  a sacred and safe space of our own which we associate with rest. That changed when the pandemic hit; confined to our homes indefinitely more than once, the divide of space between work, leisure, and rest started to merge. Is home still a place of comfort? The luxury we once had to switch up our routine, or seek a change of environment is now controlled. For most of us, every day is the same, with little to distinguish between one another. 

This series of paintings documents my time at home during the pandemic. With the routine of each day appearing the same as before, my creative practice is utilised as an unconventional exercise in recording and documenting the days. Using the hyperrealist technique, I intend to beguile the reality of my subject. While the presence of the subject of my painting may appear real to the eyes, it is not to the sense of touch.




Tujuh Hari - 1/7

Monday
Wood parquet flooring
Floor from the artist studio





Tujuh Hari - 2/7

Tuesday
Rag with paint stain.
Used by artist in cleaning brushes or pallete knife.





Tujuh Hari - 3/7

Wednesday
A part of the back of a canvas





Tujuh Hari - 4/7

Thursday
Colour pencils lined up according to colours.





Tujuh Hari - 5/7

Friday
Tool box.
Tools used by artist in the studio, e.g., 
for stretching canvases or hanging artworks.





Tujuh Hari - 6/7

Saturday
Glass pallete with green, pink and orange paint.






Tujuh Hari - 7/7

Sunday
Page 188 of a book, ‘A Little Life’ by
Hanya Yanagihara.





Tujuh Hari

Atiqah Khairul Anuar
Oil paint on canvas
25.5 x 20 cm (each)
2021
RM2,600 (Sold as a set) / Avalaible





Empati

Atiqah Khairul Anuar
Oil paint on canvas
25.5 x 20 cm (each)
2021
RM1,400 / Avalaible


This paired artwork comes with a smiley and a sad face emoji on the back of canvas. The back of a canvas is usually not to be seen or shown. I made this artwork during the lockdown when we were forced to be at home at all times.

There was not much space for us to do anything. These two emotions were separated by each canvas yet are placed besides each other, a reference to neighbours or people who are isolated. We may not know what is happening in their lives if we don’t make the extra effort to check on them. The back of a canvas may not be getting as much attention as the front.

It only takes an extra step for us to check on others; To make sure everyone is doing fine. I appreciate the friends I have who are a phone call away. Because I get that being at home does not mean you will be at ease.







Catu

Atiqah Khairul Anuar
Oil paint on canvas
60 x 60 cm
2021
RM2,000 / Reserved


In this painting, a brown coloured paper is folded to form a table, 7 rows vertically and 6 horizontally. Representing a calendar. A self-made calendar. With scrap of paper that is found in my studio. Pasted with a masking tape at the back of a canvas. "Catu" is a Malay word with a meaning of ration, shares or portion. In the time of pandemic, I often feel the need to think of what may come tomorrow. But as we have been through it too long, It seems that it does not matter as much. I let the days pass by, not thinking of what day or date it is. Therefore my calendar may not look like a calendar anymore. No days, no dates. The paper is only held up by a piece of masking tape, waiting to fall off and then be thrown away.













Atiqah Khairul Anuar (b.1995) received her formal art education from Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) with an MA in Fine Arts and Technology. Inspired by everyday objects that are often overlooked, her subject matters usually explore notions of time and self, and tend to also concern current issue. Through her use of the hyper realistic technique in her paintings, she creates a game of illusion in her artworks.

Having recently completed her residency programme with Rumah Seni Selangor (Russel), Atiqah was involved in group exhibition ‘ANGAN BAROK’ at the end of 2020 with two other resident artists. In 2017, she was also selected got for an artist residency programme at Saung Banon Arts, Yogyakarta where she participated in a few group exhibitions locally.

Recent showcases including Pameran Seni Amal Cov-Art19 (Rumah Seni Selangor), WRWT (Segaris), OEUVRE (Galeri Prima),KICK START (Segaris). Atiqah has also received awards such as Jury’s Pick, Art Against AIDS (2017) and Best Interpretation of The Theme, Energy – Present & Future (Petronas Competition), Petronas Gallery (2015).




Clara Wong

In my interest and study of philosophy and metaphysics, I have developed many questions about life. My observation of my relationships, various religions, and the world around me has raised a sense of curiousity within me. In search of the truth of life, my paintings have ultimately become an expression of these questions. I hope that through my work, I am able to balance these questions with achieving inner peace.

My choice of pigment is unique to my work; a mixture of cement and acrylic, the medium influences the colour, texture, brushstrokes, and ambience of my paintings. In a time where we are in a time where we are surrounded by so many distractions, we often forget to take in the environment we occupy. Through my use of a medium (cement), that is born from the earth, such as sand, clay, and leaves, I would like to invite the audience to observe the nature around us. Stones being a very natural product is currently the main subject matter of my paintings. There is a narrative of unspecified stories through the construct of the different compositions of the stones; through each arrangement and consideration towards space and form, I hope to inspire a sense of peaceful introspection towards life within my audience. 





Long For...

Clara Wong Pei San
Cement and Acrylic on Canvas
91.44 x 91.44 cm
2021 
RM 2,500 / Avalaible


"Long for… being around you,
Long for… you to come back to me,
Long for… the time we spent together,
Long for… the glimpse of you from the past
However …
I’m still standing here lonely,
and…
Precipitating my loneliness..."

- By Clara WPS





Persistence

Clara Wong Pei San
Cement and Acrylic on Canvas
91.44 x 91.44 cm
2021 
RM 2,500 / Avalaible


"It is a feat,
when you think everything is doomed,
You would never know it...
That is my insistence.
I will do everything possible to let you
stand on high places and apex,
superintending beneath,
just because of...
My persistence."

- By Clara WPS






Grow With...

Clara Wong Pei San
Cement and Acrylic on Canvas
91.44 x 91.44 cm
2021 
RM 2,500 / Avalaible


"What is growth 
without accompanied by the pressure of another,
What is accomplishment without accompanied of  another’s accomplishment,
Don’t forget the initial purpose,
Don’t forget the bits and pieces along the way,
Build yourself with gratitude and consideration,
That is the essence of growth…"

- By Clara WPS



Clara Wong Pei San (b. 1986, Johor) received her diploma in Fine Art from the Southern University College (SUC), Johor Malaysia, in 2018. Featuring works of mixed media, oil painting, sketching, the concept and thought behind her artistic practice often explores notions of philosophy and metaphysics. From analysing and experimenting with the different painting mediums and structure, she has developed her own unique approach in her use of medium when creating her artworks.

Participation in selected group exhibitions include HOM Art Open (2021), Selangor, and Malaysia Art2U Exhibition (2019), Johor. She has also been included in the catalogue of the Southern University College under the school’s Faculty of Art and Design Department. Having travelled to various countries, she believes that her exposure to the different cultures of various countries has informed her work. She allows her knowledge and understanding of philosophy and truth in relation to world culture and human society to influence her paintings.




Heidhir Hamdan

My artistic practice revolves around the idea of detribalisation, and the escalation of the digital era from my perspective as an individual from a middle-class society. While I grew up with strong influences of my socio-cultural way of living instilled in me, my exposure towards western media had also created a sense of detachment from my cultural upbringing and norm.

Channeling that detachment, along with my interest towards the digital age into my work, I have come to identify that there is a gap of development in both physical and digital environments between different societal communities. Evidently, there is a drastic delay of modernisation in way of life, thinking, and exposure to technology within the middle to lower-class groups.

Through drawing inspiration from western media and advanced technology, among other things, I engage in both orthodox and digital approaches to my work. Using the techniques of painting, image transfer, and photo manipulation, I am able to depict futuristic elements and the advancement of technology with the effect of old photographs. Essentially, my paintings deliver a commentary of the escalation of the digital age from the shoes of a middle-class individual. 



Space Odyssey

Heidhir Hamdan
Mix media on Canvas, 
158.5 x 100 cm
2021
RM 3,550 / Avalaible






Simulation Rift

Heidhir Hamdan
Mix media on Canvas
159 x 87 cm
2021 
RM 3,450 / Avalaible




Gateway

Heidhir Hamdan
Mix media on Canvas
80 x 57 cm 
2021
RM 1,200 / Avalaible






Sunday Night Ritual

Heidhir Hamdan
Mix media on Canvas
71.5 x 57 cm 
2021
RM 1,150 / Avalaible






Mark of The Beast

Heidhir Hamdan
Mix media on Canvas 
160 x 82.5 cm
2021 
RM 3,220 / Avalaible





Heidhir Hamdan (b.1993 Selangor) received his M.A in Fine Art and Technology at University Technology of Mara (UiTM) Shah Alam, in 2020. His creative practice broadly includes works of painting, digital art and mixed media; he draws inspiration from a variety of themes including music, design, nature, and social science. His work is often a visual commentary surrounding the middle-class community in Malaysia and the impact of the digital age on this particular group. 

Heidhir’s work has consistently been featured in group exhibitions since 2013. Participation in selected group exhibitions include, HOM Art Open 2021 at Hom Art Trans, EMERGENT at Galeri Prima (2020), ISOULATION at UiTM Shah Alam (2020), Unknown at Segaris (2019), and U12 Revival at Galeri Prima (2019).


 


Wong Hui Lynn

The concept behind my work has to do with the study of the aspect of duality within people, events, and things. I believe that contradictions exist in everything; nothing is either black or white, or good or bad. This is comparable to the indivisible whole, of yin and yang, where opposing characteristics and forces are complementary, and brings balance and harmony towards one another.

The idea behind my practice was informed by the study of my personality as an introvert. Having read the book, ‘The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World’ by Marti Olsen Laney, my perception towards introverts was developed, thus allowing me to better understand myself. Introverts are generally easily misunderstood due to their different ways of expressing themselves, and struggles with communicating as much or as well as extroverts. As the personality of an extrovert is easily accepted and embraced by society, it is easy for an introvert to feel out of place and pressured to change themselves.

I wish to depict the voices of the introverts through my creative practice. Through expressions of their more reserved but introspective nature, I hope to nurture a sense of understanding and acceptance towards their character. We each have a role to play in this world; I believe that like the concept of yin and yang, introverts and extroverts have the ability to complement one another, and bring balance as a whole.




I think I almost got it

Wong Hui Lynn
Oil painting on wood
74 x 121 cm
2021
RM2,800 / Avalaible






Should I get a Haircut? 

Wong Hui Lynn
Oil painting on wood
118 x 76 cm
2021
RM2,400 / Avalaible





Why Are You Snickering?

Oil painting on wood
103 x 76 cm
2021
RM2,700 / Avalaible




Based in Kuala Lumpur, Wong Hui Lynn (b.1995), also known as Panney to her friends, graduated from Dasein Academy of Art with a Diploma in Fine Art. With a background in interiors design, she has had an interest in drawing and design long before her path eventually led her to study fine art. Enjoying the freedom and diversity in expression that life as an artist has introduced to her, Panney has found her calling in physicalizing her ideas and thoughts. While oil painting has been a dominant medium in her practice, she is interested in eventually exploring the use of other mediums. Her works have largely consisted of a mix of both 2 and 3-Dimensional forms, and concerns her thoughts on human conscience as well as the personality of an introvert.

Since graduating, Panney has actively taken part in several group exhibitions including HOM Art Open (2021), So(ul) Art, Artas Gallery (2020), and the Fine Art Show, Ampang Community Gallery, Ampang (2020) among several others. She has also received awards such as Jury’s Pick, Art Against AIDS (2020) and consolation prize for the EXISM Art Competition (2019). 

 




3M Open Studio Showcase by Afiq Zainal, Viko Zhijune & Yong Hui Lin


HOM Art Trans proudly presents the latest 3M Studio showcase, featuring the body of works of three emerging artists. Fresh from the 3M Studio programme, we have "Untitled" by Afiq Zainal, "Before We Remember" by Viko Ng Zhi June, and "After a Splendid Moment" by Yong Hui Lin.

Highlighting a diverse set of ideas and musings across their respective body of works, these body of works are the product of the artists' three-month involvement in the 3M Studio Programme. In conceiving works that best represent their distinctive interests and concerns, they have emerged from the programme with newfound discipline and confidence instilled within their creative practice.




Untitled by Afiq Zainal

From a psychological perspective, emotion is the word used to describe the complex state of instinctive or intuitive feeling. Our surroundings, circumstances, and reasoning can create emotional waves that have influence over our thought and behaviour. I visualize these waves of emotions as an infinite form; it is a continuous cycle of circumstances, which translates to feelings, and then actions.

In this series, I intend to explore the emotions surrounding ego. While healthy doses of ego have the potential to yield positive results such as developing resilience and confidence, like everything in life, there is a need for balance. Unhealthy ego can create toxic thinking patterns, poor decisions, and arrogance among other negative qualities. As one of the most common, and potentially damaging traits found within mankind, I explore the destructive results of unhealthy ego when we fail to manage the emotions behind it, and balance them with humility.

Comprising of a number of print works and drawings, Untitled illustrates a solid form meant to represent external strength, with manipulation towards its form to express emotional instability stemmed from ego. In some works, the subject matter can be found being slowly crushed by the pressure of a rope tied tightly around it. While my body of work aims to shine light towards the scars and the long-term, negative effects of ego despite our perceived strength, it is merely an observation and study of the consequences rather than a solution.


Untiled. No 2.

Etching and Aquatint on 200gsm Watercolor Paper
59.5 x 42 cm / 2021
Edition 1 of 10
RM600


Unititled. No 3.

Etching and Aquatint on 200gsm Watercolor Paper
59.5 x 42 cm / 2021
Edition 1 of 10
RM600 / Reserved

Untitled. No 1.

Etching and Aquatint on 200gsm Watercolor Paper
59.5 x 42 cm / 2021
Edition 1 of 10
RM600 / Reserved



Untitled. No 16.

Colour Pencil on 200gsm Drawing Paper
38 x 28 cm / 2021
RM500


Untitled. No 16.

Colour Pencil on 200gsm Drawing Paper
38 x 28 cm / 2021
RM500 / Reserved


Untitled. No 18.

Pencil and color pencil on 200gsm Drawing paper
38cm x 28cm / 2021
RM580


Untitled. No 8.

Pencil and color pencil on 200gsm Drawing paper
38cm x 28cm / 2021
RM400


Untitled. No 11.

Pencil and color pencil on 200gsm Drawing paper
28 x 38cm / 2021
RM400

Untitled. No 13.

Pencil on 200gsm Drawing paper
28 x 38 cm / 2021
RM400




Based in Klang, artist Afiq zainal, was born in 1996. A full-time artist, he received his formal art education at UiTM Shah Alam, Selangor. His creative practice concerns how our environment and circumstances have the ability to influence and shape human emotions and character through his artistic practice. Not limited to a specific medium, he explores with a variety of printmaking techniques, graphite, colour pencils and more. Choosing to work on a smaller scale than most, he believes that the size of his work contributes to its individual impact and spirit.

Over the last few years, Afiq has actively participated in several group exhibitions. Several to note, include Sacred Garden at ARTO Movement (2020), Cetak Cerita at AP Art Gallery (2020), Kuala Lumpur International Miniprint (2019), Ipoh International Art Festival in Ipoh, Perak (2019), among others.

















.

Before We Remember by Viko Zhijune

The series "Before We Remember" comprises of an on-going journey where I explore my personal emotions and memories through the of study of my relationship with my surroundings. It can be observed that there has been a consistent presence of landscapes within the composition of my paintings. What I have discovered through much reflection, is that the personal significance of landscapes to me lies in my need to capture the memory of it.

Playing with dots, shapes, and colours, I attempt to create landscapes of nature that appear dreamy and unclear. The intention is to portray our inability to remember the details of every moment. In the time of modern technology, we take for granted the ease of capturing an image or moment through our smart phones. However, I have come to realise that while the memory of significant and impactful emotions may be easier to recall, the visual preservation of every single moment I have experienced are not as sharp. The experience of seeing a landscape and recalling every detail is to me is parallel to my inability to recall other moments I have lived in this life. Thus, our memories are but, an incomplete sketch. While the general structure of an event experienced and emotions felt may be present, over time, our hold of its accuracy becomes hazy.

Try as we might, we may not be able to commit every single detail our lives to memory. Yet the question remains, do we need to remember the details? Through the watery, unrefined, and blurry landscapes of "Before We Remember", I hope to convey these exact musings.



Before Monsoon

Oil on canvas
90 x 114 cm / 2021
RM3,800


Monsoon

Oil on canvas
120 x 182 cm / 2021
RM4,500


Silence Hill

Oil on canvas
120 x 182 cm / 2021
RM4,500

Unknown I

Oil on canvas
61 x 80 cm / 2021
RM2,000

Unknown II

Oil on canvas
61 x 80 cm / 2021
RM2,000

Passengers

Oil on canvas
120 x 243 cm / 2021
RM5,500



Based in Kajang, Ng Zhi June, also known as "Viko", was born in 1993. Graduating from Dasein Academy of Art with a Diploma in Fine Art, she has a keen interest in exploring the influence of her surroundings to her "inner world" and her memories. With her consistent themes of nature and consideration towards their relationship towards space, she seeks to express her emotional responses visually through compositions of landscapes and nature.

Since graduating, Viko has pursued her career as a fine artist through her regular participation in competitions and local group exhibitions. Selected participation in exhibitions include Drift at Suma Orientalis (2019), Small World at Artemis Gallery (2019), RRRAWRRR!!! At Maybank Foundation (2018), Shenzhen International Art Fair (2017).










After The Splendid Moment by Yong Hui Lin

Concerning the gradual decline of traditional culture after a once glorious period, the series “After The Splendid Moment” draws attention to the final glimmer of light to the once respected and celebrated Chinese lanterns. Symbolic and significant to the Chinese culture, the bright and vivid imagery of the lanterns are essentially projections of good fortune, health, and other blessings for the future. Brought to our country during the time of the Tang Dynasty, the art of traditional lanterns was once a widely cherished and respected practice within the Chinese and Peranakan communities. From the elaborate designs and shapes of lanterns that have graced the homes and temples of the Chinese people, it is unfortunate that the art of traditional lantern making is a dying craft in Malaysia.

According to a research conducted, it was discovered that there were only two traditional lantern workshops left in our country at that time. However, the Penang lantern master had sadly passed away in 2014, while the other who resides in Malacca is over 80 years; neither of them had an apprentice to pass on their skill and knowledge of the intricate craft of lantern making. It is my belief that the lack of understanding, patience, and appreciation nurtured towards the art of traditional lanterns has been a contributing factor to the practice's gradual decline. Thus, I hope to cultivate and highlight the beauty of this lost craft, as well as of the Chinese culture as a whole through this body of work. With close up perspectives of the lantern, I included imagery which highlights aspects and themes of the Chinese culture. To represent the passing of time, I have chosen to complement the composition of each painting with irregular peels of paint which were originally inspired by an aged wall from a street in town.



After the Splendid Moment – Door God l

Acrylic, modelling paste, emulsion paint on canvas
90 x 90 cm / 2021
RM2,000 / Reserved


After the Splendid Moment – Door God lI

Acrylic, modelling paste, emulsion paint on canvas
90 x 90 cm / 2021
RM2,000 /Reserved


After the Splendid Moment – Peony

Acrylic, modelling paste, emulsion paint on canvas
90 x 90 cm / 2021
RM2,000 / Reserved

After the Splendid Moment - Kirin

Acrylic, modelling paste, emulsion paint on canvas
90 x 90 cm / 2021
RM2,000 / Avalaible


After the Splendid Moment - Goldfish

Acrylic, modelling paste, emulsion paint on canvas
90 x 90 cm / 2021
RM2,000 / Avalaible


Born in 1989, Yong Hui Lin recently received her Diploma in Fine Arts from the Malaysian Institute of Art (MIA) in 2020. Her work concerns the gradual decline of the traditional culture in Malaysia, and the necessity of preservation of traditional crafts. Thus, through her creative practice, she hopes to draw attention to the traditions of her culture through contemporary portrayals and impressions. She hopes to further study and immerse herself within other local cultures and traditions in the development of future projects and series. 

As an emerging artist, she has been involved with several art projects and received a number of awards for art competitions held in Malaysia, such as Art Against AIDS Competition, Usaha Tegas Heritage Competitions, and Viva Homes Kolam design competitions, among others. Participation in recent group exhibitions include (Un)wrap Open Art Exhibition at Creative Art Hub, Sunway Putra Mall KL (2021), Posi+ive Online Exhibition at Segaris Art Centre KL (2021), Art Against AIDS at White Box @ Publika (2019), “Angel’s Hand” Women Art Exhibition at the Chinese Assenmbly Hall (2019), and ArtEDecor at MATRADE Centre Kuala Lumpur, (2019).