Women Unbounded

 


Unbounded and Unstoppable: Women then, now, and tomorrow. 

By Elizabeth Low Sue Mei

Upon reflection and analysis of the works featured in this exhibition, there is a sense of pride in seeing the diverse response delivered by the individual women artists to the theme “female relations”. We share the same gender and have similar experiences. Yet, our individuality and uniqueness shine ever so brightly in the stories and perspectives we choose to share with the world.  Affirmatively, the name of the showcase alone, Women Unbounded, suggests a compelling narrative of its own: that women are not bound to the fate we have been handed, and are not confined to roles fixed by societal norms. 

Womanhood… there is so much to be said about the experience. From the roles we were (and for some of us, still) expected to play, to the roles we have redefined through the ages, it is clear that strength and resilience is part of our DNA. Undoubtedly, women today have defied the mentalities of our forefathers with everything we have gone on to achieve, from being a working mother, to being CEO, and president. Yet, the core of the traditional roles of being a mother, daughter, sister, granddaughter, and so on, still, and always will hold weight. It is true that we see the world differently; but different is not necessarily wrong. Our experiences gained through the roles we have taken on merely provide us with an alternative perspective and understanding. Perhaps what may be perceived as our weaknesses, is the key to our strengths.

Women, Roles, and Relationships

Since gaining our National Independence in 1957, women in Malaysia today have not only received greater access to areas such as education and employment, but have also gone on to achieve roles that allow us to participate in power-sharing and decision-making developments. Today, we hold seats in parliament, run our own businesses, and hold CEO positions. Basically, we get to chase our dreams and be anything we want to be. While, no doubt, there is still much to be done in terms of reaching gender equality and safeguarding women’s rights and status, our role and place in society have evolved from the time of our grandmothers. Most of us are presented with greater opportunities than of our mothers, and have had the chance to choose our paths. 

Familial, platonic, and intimate: the word relationship is vast and multi-layered, extending across multiple roles as a parent, a sibling, a friend, a lover, and so many more. There is a variety of dimensions to the relationships we maintain and hold as women today. On the topic of the roles played by women, the nature of the relationships we share with the people in our lives continue to evolve drastically, like our status and role in the employment sector,  where  gender roles in some of our relationships have been challenged and redefined.

There are still expectations and stereotypes tied to our position as a woman, especially in more traditional families. Take for example, the notion of a mother as one who educates and nurtures her children, or maintains the household, is still a role widely expected by most traditional families. That is not to say that it is beneath a woman to do so, rather perhaps it is a responsibility to be shared between partners in a relationship. While there is no shame in choosing to take on these responsibilities, the imposition of what a woman’s “duty” is to her family is something that has been challenged and redefined over the last couple of decades. 

The term ‘relationships’ also extend to our relationship with ourselves. While there is a long road ahead of us, the formidable stigma surrounding mental health in Malaysia has garnered respectable attention and awareness as of late. Addressed by artists, public figures, institutions, and the media, the concept of nurturing a healthy relationship with ourselves is slowly, but surely, being acknowledged and practiced. Both men and women today have their own challenges, and struggle with defining their roles in society today; however, with this being a showcase by women artists on female relations we shift our focus to women and our relationships with ourselves. I find that the need to take care of everyone besides ourselves is a common trait in women. Some say its part of our DNA to be nurturing and empathetic, others claim it a result of centuries of living in patriarchal society. Needless to say, whatever your opinion is on the matter, we take better care of our loved ones when we take care of ourselves. Most importantly, we would lead a much more contented and meaningful life by making time and space for a relationship with ourselves.

Women as Artists 

When we talk about art history, naturally the conversation gravitates towards western art history - at least at some point.  First published in 1971, the essay “Why Have There Been No Great Female Artists” by Linda Nochlin is said to be one of the greatest contributions to feminist art history. By looking at the title alone, one might find that to be contradicting.  However, this piece of literature presents to us all the reasons why there have been no “great” women artists by the superstar standards of Michelangelo, Picasso, Van Gogh, and Jackson Pollock. Instead of bringing up or “uncovering” hidden female artists in the history of great artists, Nochlin identifies the problem in a very realistic and logical light. The lack of female accomplishment in history of art has little to do with our capabilities as a gender, but rather the obstacles that prevented women from such achievements due to the educational and institutional system. Among some of Nochlin’s arguments included the prohibition of access to nude models for any budding women artists (nude models were essential to the development of an artist’s skill between the Renaissance to the end of the 19th century), the inability to take part in opportunities that would advance their skills, and the insistence against a woman excelling too well in one thing. The latter had to do with the opinion that intellectual attainment would distract a woman from her true responsibility and role towards the welfare of her family.

Nochlin’s point? Despite every obstacle faced, it is by far a miracle that we have still gone on to achieve as much as we have today. Thus, the question of “why are there no great female artists?” has nothing to do with the female incapability, but everything to do with our capabilities in spite of the odds. From the institutional structures themselves, to the questionable social order they imposed on women through the ages, there is a sense of rebellious pride in being a women artist today. We are united by our struggles, our perseverance, and by our habit of defying the status quo. To all women artists, bravo for choosing to look ahead, and redefine the role of great female artists in spite of what history has told the world. 

Diving in to Female Relationships through work of arts 

Women Unbounded features eleven, incredibly talented female artists. Including both emerging and established artists in the creative industry. Their chosen medium of expression ranges from printworks, to paintings, and assemblages. Coming from a varied background in terms of education, age, and influence, all participating artists found common ground in identifying the different relationships and roles they take on as a woman. 

Based in United Kingdom, Malaysian born Alexandra Hon is best known for her elaborate interior spaces; part of a larger narrative, the scenes she creates explores complex accounts of human interpersonal relationships. Her featured work, The Matriarch (2021) is a linocut print work inspired by her relationship with her husband and her role as a wife. Coming from what she describes as an “egalitarian style” familial upbringing, growing up there was minimal gender-role associations for Alexandra. For her husband, coming from a traditional Punjabi family, the structure of responsibilities and roles in a household for him differed from the one she grew up in. 

The global lockdown brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic had made room for the chance to restructure gender roles in her marriage. In that light, Alexandra reflects on the role of her mother in the family, and the growing parallels she sees between her late mother and herself. Having retired from her job in her 40s, her mother took on certain responsibilities at home, out of choice rather than obligation. Her mother was essentially the de facto matriarch and the head of the household as income was not the defining position of authority in her family. Depicting the dynamics of the artist’s marriage, The Matriarch (2021) illustrates her role as a woman, an artist, and a wife, all while staying true to her relationship with herself.

Educated at University Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Amy Nazira is best known for her distinctive style of portraiture. The cartoon-like inspired features of her characters tend to evoke a sense of freedom and genuineness in expression, through Amy’s blatant disregard to imitate the “correct” proportions of the human anatomy. Helianthus (2021) depicts a girl, donned in a yellow dress and hat, who I find resembles the children book and television series character, Madeline. Known for her wit and craftiness, the outgoing fictional French character shines through the girl portrayed in Amy’s painting. She carries a painted white and blue pot of sunflowers, possibly resembling a close relationship to nature and art. Traditionally, receiving flowers have long been associated as a token of a romantic advance. Yet perhaps, Helianthus (2021) may just be a self-portrait of the artist; the potted sunflowers a gift to her herself, an affirmation towards her self-love and worth.  

A trademark of the Manchester School of Art’s graduate, Haz Yusup, the faces of the two nude female figures in Between Love (2021), are concealed by a white cloth. Inspired by the “Death of Lucretia”, the story of an Italian girl who took her own life with a dagger after she was raped, Haz Yusup’s Between Love (2021) reanimates the story with an alternate ending. A dagger lays mere inches away from the woman on the left who reaches out fondly to the other figure. It is clear that the woman closest to the dagger resemble “Lucretia” as the sexually abused victim between the two. Yet the dagger is pointed away from the body, suggesting hope in the fate of said victim, in her pursuit to heal from her past wounds and learn to trust again. In this context, perhaps the hidden faces of the figures imply a state of uncertainty and self-doubt in the midst of overcoming and moving past the trauma. Between Love (2021) is evidently a portrayal of a woman’s relationship with intimacy, post distressing and invasive events. 

Highly influenced by feminine themes and metaphors, Janiz Chan received her formal art education at the Malaysian Institute of Arts (MIA) in 1989. In Duet (2019), we are faced with two women engaged in contemporary dance while surrounded by a majestic array of flowers and a hint of peacock feathers. Attempting to demonstrate women who have broken free from the chains of societal pressures imposed on to women, the two identical dancers in Duet (2019) seem to move freely with great grace and strength.

With commitment towards actively shining light on Malaysia’s rich heritage in her works, Janiz often incorporates both traditional dance, and contemporary responses to cultural dance in her works. Choosing to embrace her Malaysian roots and culture, Duet (2019) appears to illustrate the dancing figures as women liberated from societal norms, while still maintaining their ties and pride towards their culture and heritage.  

Graduate of Dasein Academy of Arts, Joy Ng, portrays a young girl amidst a crowd in the city. In hues of blue and pink, the vision is almost dreamy almost as though one is floating subconsciously through the motions of life.  Joy relates the scene of Longing (2020) to every time she’s in a street full of people. Seeing them for more than what they appear to be, the artist finds that her sensitivity and empathy towards every passing individual is heightened. Consciously, she recognises that every person she passes by, albeit briefly, are people who are rich with their own stories full of pain, laughter, desires, and so much more. She acknowledges this unexplainable relationship and connection towards anyone in her vicinity as a trait derived from what she identifies as her feminine attributes as a nurturer.  

From engaging in traditional mediums of visual expression such as painting, to using found materials in creating figurative objects, Liew Sze Lin works across a range of different mediums. In her featured works You Can Cry Here I (2021) and You Can Cry Here II (2021), the Dasein Academy of Art trained artist explores the relationship between herself and other women. Utilising red onion sacks as her main material, Sze Lin weaves the red wires into the once utilitarian material. The repetitive patterns created by weaving is meant to reflect routine intertwined in to the daily lives of women.

A graduate of the National Academy of Arts, Culture & Heritage (ASWARA), Marisa Ng, remains to be one of the handful of abstract expressionist artists in the local art scene. With strokes of red and pink, amidst the storm of greys and darker colours, the diptych Happy to See You (2020) is part of ongoing series entitled “Love Letters”. Marisa shares about her struggle with self-love; through “Love Letters”, she works to nurture appreciation and care towards herself. Essentially, each painting is a love letter to herself, painted to express not only the warm and the fuzzy, but also the sad and the pain in reflection of the ups and downs in any relationship. In her journey of courting and falling in love with herself again, Happy to See You (2020) displays an excerpt of the artist’s relationship with herself. 

Caution, (2021) by Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) graduate Nor Tijan Firdaus, is a self-portrait made out of an assemblage of discarded plastic toys on a wooden panel. Inspired by the Malay proverb “Tangan yang mengayun buaian dapat mengoncang dunia”, Tijan talks of how mothers are able to contribute innovation and ideas to the world even from their love and guidance at home. In between the hope and concerns for her growing children, she recognises that the role she plays in their life could help shape them in to future leaders. It starts from home, and Tijan believes that her relationship with her children puts her in the position to impact their development and spirit.

Having pursued her formal art training from the Malaysian Institute of Art, artist Ong Xing Ru conveys notions of feminine traits such as elegance and grace through Morning Melody (2021). The scene is set in what appears to be a garden with a glorious arrangement of plants; a figure can be found playing the piano with a number of animals, both domestic and wild as neighbourly occupants. The harmony of the various elements indicates a serene and relaxed setting. What Xing Ru hopes to show through her technique, is the delicacy and care in her handling of details in her painting. It is apparent, that her gentler and refined nature is present with her depiction of a pleasant morning. In Morning Melody (2021) Xing Ru illustrates her relationship with nature, and perhaps her pride in her what she considers to be a vital part of her feminine identity.   

In Bila Celik (2021), Raimi Sani illustrates her relationship with her child as a mother through an oil painting of a stuffed bear in the arms of a sleeping toddler. In conversation with her, the Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) alumni reflects on the Malay proverb as quoted by her grandmother during birthdays growing up: “pejam celik, pejam celik dah setahun tua". It is a fond and nostalgic expression toward how quickly time goes by and how swiftly we grow up, most especially from the eyes of our elders. As a mother herself today, Raimi finds herself savouring every moment awake with her child. Bila Celik (2021) shows us the first scene she is greeted with in the morning.  


Be Yourself (2021) by Trixie Tan explores self-acceptance in a community where expectations tied to one’s gender, run deeps. She talks of her identity as an artist, and how she chooses to tell her stories through her creative expressions. In Be Yourself (2021) the artist talks about being your true self, in spite of the stereotypes and societal pressures imposed on us.
Formally trained at Dasein Academy of Arts, nature and the female presence appears to be a constant element in her repertoire of work. Surrounded by nature, the young girl in the painting is identical to the less vivid and muted figure behind her. This potentially suggests two versions of one person, and the internal battles that we all face in truly being ourselves. 

Breaking Glass Ceilings 

Women Unbounded engages in an ongoing conversation on women, and the roles we play in the various relationships we engage in. Every featured artist has shown a display of their rich individuality; it is thrilling to see the variety of perspectives, and the unity in embracing what makes us a mother, a daughter, a woman, and most importantly, as a human being. We have taken big strides in our achievements, and have gone above and beyond in paving the way for our daughters tomorrow. There is still much to be done, but for now, we can stand proud knowing that we have broken the glass ceilings faced by our grandmothers, and mothers before them.  



Duet

Janiz Chan 
Oil on Linen | 90 x 78 cm | 2019
RM 7,600

Caution

Nor Tijan Firdaus 
Plastic toys on wood panel Coated with epoxy clear matte 2k Resin | 91.5 x 61 cm | 2021
RM 7,500



Be yourself 

Trixie Tan Lu Man 
Oil on canvas | 121 x 91.5 cm | 2020
RM 4,000



Longing 

Joy Ng 
Oil on canvas | 100 x 151 cm | 2020
RM 3,775



Bila Celik 

Raimi Sani 
Oil on canvas | 75.5 x 105 cm | 2021
RM 3,800



'Helianthus'

Amy Nazira
Oil on canvas | 70 x 70 cm | 2021
RM 1,500



'Between Love'

Haz Yusup 
Oil on curved canvas | 35 x 50 cm | 2021
RM 2,500



Morning Melody 

Ong Xing Ru 
Acrylic on canvas | 106 x 68 cm | 2021
RM 4,600


Happy to see you

Marisa Ng
Oil on canvas | 80 x 160 cm dyptich | 2020
RM 8,500




The Matriarch 
Edition 1 of 15

Alexandra Hon
Linocut on Zerkall | 57.7 x 41.2 cm | 2021
RM 1,200 


You can cry here I 

Liew Sze Lin 
Onion sack  and wire | 45 x 42 cm | 2021 
RM 1,200


You can cry here II 

Liew Sze Lin 
Onion sack and wire | 45 x 42 cm | 2021 
RM 1,200










mind(E)scape

 


HOM Art Trans would like to present Perak born Fadli Mokhtar’s 3M open studio showcase, mind(E)scape. Featuring 11 monoprint and collage, on canvas and paper, the artist’s most recent body of work is essentially part of a bigger journey of self-discovery within his practice. Fadli describes the process of bringing these works of art to life as “an escape from reality”. Thus, this series inherently provides insight to the landscape of Fadli’s mind. Thoughtful and contemplative, the open studio teases the audience with the opportunity to explore fragments of the artist’s memories, dreams, and yearnings.

This showcase will conclude Fadli’s participation with the 3M Studios, also known as HOM Art Trans’ intensive studio programme. As one of the artists selected to undergo the programme, Fadli was provided with a studio space for three months, where he was able to focus on the development of this body of work. With ample room to experiment, he was able to work on a scale larger than previously accomplished. Out of the 11 featured art works from mind(E)scape, five are canvases ranging from 122 x 153cm, to 100 x 100 cm, with the remaining six art works on paper; works from this series will be open to the general public at HOM Studios between the 24th to 31st of March 2021.

Fadli’s use of technique and approach to his work had been largely influenced by his time in Japan, where he was based for four years. It is evident he has actively pursued growth and sought out opportunities to share his work with the world with four solo exhibitions on his belt, three of which were showcased in Japan, and multiple exhibitions locally and internationally. Presently, he resides and works between Pahang and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.




Sesuatu Yang Tidak Diketahui

Monotype, Image Transfer, and Collage on Canvas 
122 x 153cm
2021
RM 3,000


Potret Diri sebagai sebuah Monumen

Monotype, Image Transfer and Collage on Canvas 
122 x 153cm
2021
SOLD


Bicara Bapak Dengan Anak Bilamana Ibu Menghijau

Monotype, Image Transfer and Collage on Canvas
122 x 153 cm
2021
RM 3,000


The Enlightened Morning 

Monotype, Transfer Image and Collage on Canvas, 
122 x 150 cm 
2021
Collection of HOM Residency


Amna in Her Own World 
 
Monotype, transfer Image and Collage on Canvas 
100 x 100 cm
2021
RM 1500


Bahang Jiwa,

Monotype and Collage on Paper 
28.5 x 39 cm 
2021 
RM 900


Homecoming 

Monotype and Collage on Paper
28.5 x 39 cm
2021 
RM 900


Jahanam 

Fadli Mokhtar
Monotype and Collage on Paper
28.5 x 39 cm 
2021 
RM 900


Sacred Mountain 

Monotype and Collage on Paper 
28.5 x 39 cm 
2021 
RM 900


Menanti Si Godot 

Monotype and Collage on Paper 
28.5 x 39cm 
2021 
RM 900



Globalization 

Fadli Mokhtar 
Monotype and Collage on Paper
28.5 x 39 cm 
2021 
RM 900



Fadli Mokhtar (b.1986) was born in Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia; he currently lives and works between Pahang and Kuala Lumpur. Having pursued his formal fine art training from Universiti Teknologi Mara Malaysia (UiTM), he currently holds an MFA. Fadli’s artistic endeavours has provided him with opportunities to exhibit his work on both local and international scale; he has been featured in group shows in China, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, Bulgaria, Colombia, Serbia, and Indonesia.
Notably, he spent four years in Japan, where he held three solo exhibitions between 2015 to 2018.  His artwork is included in the collections of National Visual Art Gallery Malaysia, Gallery of Japan Artists’ Association Japan, Gallery Tuanku Nur Zahirah , Malaysia , Faculty Of Art & Design UiTM Shah Alam, Malaysia, Faculty Of Art & Design UiTM, Kelantan Malaysia , Gallery Malaysia National University UKM Bangi, News Straits Times Berhad Malaysia, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMSC), Malaysia

Artist Statement

My work serves as a metaphor of my spiritual journey as a man and an artist, exploring the concept of life as a journey and process of self-discovery. I believe that the need to understand the reason of our existence are tendencies inherently tied to human nature; perhaps our constant craving to question and reason aligns with our need to find peace and balance in our lives. This suggests the necessity of self-reflection in acceptance of the impact of significant events in our lives. 

Despite our differences, we are all somehow connected to one another, united by how we relate our past to our present and our constant desire for more. Human beings are always looking for ways to better understand themselves and their life’s purpose. With this in mind, my practice remains to be instrumental in the process of identifying my needs and my place in this world. This perception of human nature translates into my practice, drawing inspiration from fragmented memories of my own life experiences, as I attempt to navigate my own thoughts and memories. Using my own memories and experience as my chosen subject matter, my work is essentially a collage of my history.

My work comprises of layered imagery and surreal elements, and this series can be best described as a mindscape symbolising an escape from reality. Investigating memories, dreams, hopes, uncertainties, and more, this series explores the complex manner in which our thoughts and experiences actively shape us. Through the use of semiotics, abstraction, and representation, I attempt to walk the line between reality and our desires, portraying the themes of everyday life through mundane objects. Evidently, my work is a meditative way to address these soul-searching questions, and to achieve harmony and balance between my mind, body, and soul. 

My Process

As the creation of my work acts as a means of self-discovery and reflection, I would like to highlight that the arrangement of my collages is highly spontaneous and intuitive. My work is a combination printmaking, collage, and paper cutting, all of which play an important role in reaching the end product. My background in print has instilled a deep-rooted appreciation in me, for the unique marks produced in printmaking. Using monoprinting as a printmaking technique, I experiment with several types of paper; the differing properties of the various types papers used creates diversity in the results. The type of ink, surface, and pressure used to print are also contributing factors to the distinctive marks and patterns produced. 

The hands-on process of creating and building my composition is intuitive, almost second nature. I start by cutting shapes and forms from the monoprints created, and proceed by collaging them on to my chosen surface- be it paper or canvas. Most often, I am only able to pinpoint the relevance of certain forms and shapes nearing completion of a composition. It is comparable to putting together puzzle pieces to construct a picture without an image for reference; similarly, the shapes and forms that make up each of my works, are puzzle pieces of my thoughts and memories.







HOM Art Open 2021

 


HOM Art Open 2021 is an annual exhibition that seeks to provide a platform new talent, young & establish artists to showcase their artworks. The initiative aligns with a pursuit close to our hearts, that is to nurture budding artists in Malaysia. This year, we received over 100 submissions for the open call; a total of 47 artists have been selected to participate in this year’s exhibition. This showcase will highlight artists who are new to the industry, and bursting with potential and capability; we are certainly excited for the chance to highlight their work. Comprising of a varied selection of paintings, sculptures, printworks, and installation, the chosen artworks will be featured on our website, as well as all our social media platforms.


Seascape series I 

Abie Rahmat 
Digital print on photo paper
61 x 61 cm
2021
RM 250

Seascape series II

Abie Rahmat
Digital print on photo paper
61 x 61 cm
2021
RM 250

The Invisible Enemy #1

Dinesh Pushparani
ILFORD textured cotton rag paper
45.72 x 60.96 cm 
2020 
Edition 3/5 
RM 1,000


The Invisible Enemy #2

Dinesh Pushparani
ILFORD textured cotton rag paper
45.72 x 60.96 cm 
2020 
Edition 3/5 
RM1,000


Marine Life point of view 

Wafiqi Shahuddin
Digital Photography  
35.56 x 27.94 cm
RM 550


I Am A Woman 

Zaym Zarif
Printed on photo paper
15 x 8 cm 
Artist Collection


Up and Down

Afiq Zainal 
Acrylic On Canvas
120 x 73.3 cm 
2021
Reserved


Pak Kasim Minum Petang 

Afiq Zainal 
Acrylic On Canvas
90 x 60 cm 
2021
Reserved


‘twenty twenty’

Atiqah Khairul Anuar
Oil on canvas 
61 x 61 cm 
2020
Reserved


‘a.m. to p.m.’ 

Atiqah Khairul Anuar 
Oil on canvas 
25.5 x 20.5 cm 
2020
Reserved


Bed 1

Jason Teo
Oil on canvas 
180 x 130 cm 
2020
RM 3,000


Bed 4

Jason Teo
Oil on canvas 
180 x 130 cm 
2021
RM 3,000


Presence 

Clara Wong Pei San
Cement and Acrylic on Canvas 
55 x 45 cm  
2020
Reserved


Stillness  

Clara Wong Pei San
Acrylic and Cements on Canvas
90 x 90 cm  
2019
RM 3,000


Life 

Fong Jia Lok 
Oil on canvas 
137 x 132.5 cm
2020
RM 4,000


Busy Hour 

Fong Jia Lok  
122  x 122 cm 
Acrylic, ink on board  
2020
Reserved


Kartel si kitol

Azrul Azrai Mohyi 
Charcoal and Acrylic on canvas 
40 x 50 cm (each) 
2021
RM 2,000


Ikatan Kasih

Nur Syafiqah Sanusi  
Charcoal on paper 
60.96 x 45.72 cm
2020
Reserved



Dynamic III 

Gina Chuah
Acrylic and Ink on canvas
109.73 x 108.73 cm  
2020
RM 2,500


Bull - Twelves Chinese Zodiac 

Vivian Lees 
Coffee painting, gold leaves and mixed media on drawing board
29.7 x 42.0 cm
2020
RM 2,500



Snake - Twelves Chinese Zodiac 

Vivian Lees 
Coffee painting, gold leaves and mixed media on drawing board
29.7 x 42.0 cm
2020
RM 2,500


Boneka 

Hidayatullah Hamzah
Marker Pen on Paper
27.3 x 37.5 cm 
2021
RM 400


 “Lust” 

Hidayatullah Hamzah
Mix Media of Marker Pen and watercolour on paper
59.4 x 42.0 cm
2021 
RM 800


I see they are running

Wong Hui Lynn
Oil painting on plywood 
65 x 119 cm 
2020
Reserved


Pull it or I will stop it

Wong Hui Lynn
Acrylic, Oil painting on plywood and rope
130 x 125 cm 
2020
RM 3,000


Sulking II 

Alisya Fahmi 
Oil on canvas
106 x 76 cm 
2021
Reserved


Safe place 

Anis Syafiqah
Acrylic on canvas
70 x 70 cm
2021
RM 1,600


The Arrival   

Anis Syafiqah
Acrylic on canvas
102 x 76 cm 
2021
RM 2,500


"Away with the fairies" 

Jasmine Chong
Oil on canvas
91.44 x 121.92 cm
2020
RM 1,800


Epiphany 

Lim Yong Wei
Oil on Canvas 
56 x 69 cm
2020
RM 2,000


Twilight to Dusk 

Lim Yong Wei
Oil on Canvas 
85 x 60 cm 
2020 
RM 2,500


AMMA 

Mary Ann Thomas
Oil on Canvas
140 x 140 cm 
2020
RM 6,000


Uncle Lim 

Mary Ann Thomas
Oil on Canvas
127 x 96 cm 
2020
RM 4,800


 “Anang pangsut dek!” Kata ketua kelas. S.K. Lepong Balleh, Kapit, Sarawak.
  
Razali Abas
Oil on canvas
60.96 x 91.44 cm
2020
RM 1,000


Ethereal Contentment #1  

Choong Kah Mun
Oil on canvas  
70  x 70 cm  
2021
RM 1,300


Ethereal Contentment #2 

Choong Kah Mun
Oil on canvas 
70 x 70 cm 
2021
RM 1,300


Existential Wars

Amar Shahid 
Oil and gold leaf gilding on canvas, mounted on board 
182.88 x 121.92 cm
2020
RM 8,500


The Malaysia Tiger, Series 12 

Art Jamila
Acrylic on canvas 
152.4 x 91.5 cm 
2021
RM 12,000


Embracing Coronavirus Series 2  

Art Jamila
Acrylic on canvas  
152 x 91.5 cm  
2021  
RM 12,000


Freud 

Chris Tan
Oil on canvas
60 x 42 cm
2019
RM 980


1980s TV #4 

Chris Tan
Oil on canvas, diptych 
140 x 178 cm 
 2020 
Reserved


Room of This Person 

Deyanna Deraman 
Acrylic on canvas 
92 x 92 cm 
2021 
RM 2,000



Silently 

Deyanna Deraman
Acrylic on canvas 
92 x 92 cm 
2021
RM 2,000


Before His Gone (Plots Of Life) 

Faez Fahmi 
Oil On Canvas  
122 x 92 cm
2021
Reserved


A Boon From Heaven 

Heidhir Hamdan
Acrylic, Photo transfer, Photo Manipulation, and Stencil on canvas   
121.5 x 92 cm 
2020  
RM 3,000


Homage to R.R

Heidhir Hamdan 
Acrylic, Photo Transfer, Digital photo manipulation on Canvas  
84.1 x 59.4 cm 
2020
Reserved


Palmera (Licuala Paludosa)
 
Izzaty Ahamad 
Acrylic on canvas 
92 x 92 cm
2019 
RM 2,880


Calathea Lutea 

Izzaty Ahamad 
Acrylic on canvas 
75 x 75 cm 
2019
RM 2,480


A Gift for Mummy 

Aina Arif
Bitumen, charcoal, oil pastel, dried leaves, plaster of Paris, sand, plastic, and spray paint on canvas 
70.5 x 50 cm
RM 1,800


A Glimpse of ‘kinoyonon di korohianku’ I

Jennifer Reany Jipson
Acrylic on canvas
42.0 x 59.4 cm 
2021
RM 600


A Glimpse of ‘kinoyonon di korohianku’ II 

Jennifer Reany Jipson
Acrylic on canvas
42.0 x 59.4 cm 
2021
RM 600


Bony Cave

Kida (Tan Zu Men)
Oil on canvas
91.4 x 91.4 cm
2020 
RM 1,800


Chicken Landslide 

Kida (Tan Zu Men)
Oil on canvas
121 x 91.4 cm
2021
RM 2,400


Illusion ll 

Ng Jia Siang  
Watercolor 
30 x 21 cm 
2020
RM 4,000


Diffused in Landscape 

Nor Fatihah Yusof
Unique alternative photographic process on ILFORD Multigrade IV RC De Luxe silver gelatin paper 
12.5 × 9 cm  
2020 
RM 250


Sorrowful Mountain Head 

Nor Fatihah Yusof
Unique alternative photographic process on ILFORD Multigrade IV RC De Luxe silver gelatin paper 
12.5 × 9 cm 
2020
RM 250

Symbolic Gift 

Noriza Azrain 
50 x 50 cm each x 3pcs 
Mix-media 
2021
RM 2,000 set

20 Hot 20 Cold 

Putri Amrizal 
Medium : Fabric, laces & beads, hand & machine stitching Textiles installation 
120 x 180 cm
2020
RM 1,500


20 Faith 20 Fear 

Putri Amrizal
Fabric, laces, hand & machine stitching Textiles installation 
93 x 90 cm
2020
Reserved


I’m Still Alive 

Yahya Manaf 
Acrylic On Canvas 
92 x 92 cm 
2021
RM 2,000


Touching The Clouds
 
Yahya Manaf 
Acrylic On Canvas 
92 cm x 92 cm 
2021
RM 2,000


Siri Gelora; Alam Berbisik I 

Lyna Khairi 
Mix Media 
98.5 x 98.5 cm
2021
RM 4,580


Siri Gelora; Alam Berbisik II

Lyna Khairi
Mix Media 
106.5 x 106.5 cm
2021
RM 5,450


“Berlari, kemana?” 

Arif Hassan  
Relief print on paper
21 x 29.7 cm 
2021
RM 150


Hanyut 

Arif Hassan  
Etching and aquatint on paper
17.5 x 20 cm 
2020 
Edition 1/5  
Reserved

The Unseen between Us 

Mursyidah Zainal 
Woodcut and Red Thread 
23 x 15 cm 
2021  
RM 180

Protect 

Danial Fuad
Cyanotype on watercolour paper 
29 x 42 cm 
2021 
Edition of 5 + 2 AP 
RM 300

Construct #2 

Danial Fuad
Cyanotype on watercolour paper 
29 x 42 cm 
 2021 
Edition of 5 + 2 AP 
RM 300

Semboyan Sang Merpati Putih 

Izzat Azman  
Mixed Media - (Woodcut Print Acrylic and Soldier Miniature Collage on canvas and woodblock)
114 × 120 cm
2020
RM 2,000

Rainscape; Lanskap Hujan I

Hanis Farisa 
Mixed Media 
31 x 31 cm
2021
RM 1,800



A Day That Will Live In Infancy: Work 1 of 2 

Firdauz Baharuddin  
Sculpture - Mixed media - Clay, Found items
42 x 60 cm
2021
Reserved


The Shorting Hat: Work 2 of 2 

Firdauz Baharuddin 
Mixed media - Clay, Found items. 
42 x 52 cm
2021
RM 1,500


Standing Cube No. 1

Idrus Rani 
Acrylic Sheet, Wood, Industrial Paint and ready made 
75 x 50 x 50 cm 
2021
RM 2,200

Standing Cube No. 2
 
Idrus Rani
Acrylic Sheet, Wood, Industrial Paint and ready made 
75 x 50 x 50 cm 
2021
RM 2,200


Otak yang Melihat 

Ikmal Mustafa
Mix Media 
9 x 5 x 5 cm
2020
RM 350


Yang memerhati cuma akal 

Ikmal Mustafa
Mix Media 
5 x 6 x 11 cm  
2020
RM 350


Ctrl + Alt + Delete 

Haris Hilmi
Acrylic on computer keyboard 
44 x 14.5 cm 
2021
RM 800


Ctrl + Z 

Haris Hilmi
Acrylic on computer keyboard 
44 x 14.5 cm 
2021
RM 800